Some History
of the
Myers Park Neighborhood
(and surrounding areas)




RECONSTRUCTION AND THE "NEW SOUTH":

Edward Houston died in Savannah, Georgia, some time after 1874, but apparently Patrick Houston had taken over management of the Lakeland plantation about 1868.  Over the years, the entire 320 acres of the eastern half of Section 6 had been acquired by the Houstons.  Patrick Houston served on the Leon County Commission and was a state senator, presiding over the senate in 1887.  He was appointed Adjutant General of the State of Florida (commander of the Florida Militia) by Governor Henry Laurens Mitchell (served 1893-1897) in 1893, and held that position for eight years.  In 1889, Home Life in Florida referred to the plantation as "Lakeland Stock Farm", and in it Patrick Houston was described as a breeder of Durhams, Jerseys and Guernseys, 250 in all, in business 15 years.  In the agricultural report for the Tenth U.S. Census, 1879-1880, Houston was show to own 6 work oxen, 25 milk cows, 20 cattle, 20 horses, 10 mules, and 500 sheep.  This report also indicated that 90 acres were planted in corn, 75 in wheat, 5 in rye, 70 in cotton, two in Irish potatoes, and 7 in sweet potatoes, and 300 nut trees were growing on Houston's farm.  In a 1975 interview by Clifton Paisley, Annie Houston Sensabaugh, Patrick Houston's granddaughter, said that because of the fine horses bred there, the Houston plantation was commonly called Lakeland Horse Farm, and that "the Houston stock were pastured on land now a part of Country Club Estates."   Tallahassee photographer Alvan S. Harper took a number of photographs of Lakeland Plantation which appeared in Features of the Hill Country, published in 1894.

Annie Houston Sensabaugh is pictured 11th from the left on the front row in this 1910 May Day photo, taken at "the May Oak" at Lewis Park on East Park Avenue (now alas, only a stump).  Photo from Florida State Archives.

Patrick Houston continued to hold the central portion of Lakeland Plantation which later became the Woodlands Drive subdivision until his death in 1901, however he sold a western portion which he had received by inheritance from Edward Houston in July 1886,  to the Leon Heights Improvement Company in 1890.  After his death, Patrick Houston was buried in the St. Johns Episcopal Church Cemetery in downtown Tallahassee.

Home    History
This page was created on 5 December 1999.
Most recent revision 16 February 2000.